Image Image Image Image Image Image Image Image Image Image
Scroll to top

Top

No Comments

MMR – a shot in the dark?

MMR – a shot in the dark?

| On 12, Feb 2015

FacebookTwitterGoogle+PinterestWhatsApp

The alternative medicine camp has always been against the MMR (Measles, Mumps, Rubella) vaccination. Even after Andrew Wakefield was discredited for linking the MMR vaccine to autism (2010), natural health and alternative medicine fans still view it with suspicion.

Yet, how many children in Singapore have not been vaccinated? And how many of them get measles or mumps which used to be common half a century ago? I had mumps as did most of my cohort. But my 24-year-old son has not had any of the 3 (touch wood!), so I am bothered and bewildered by the continuing animosity towards the MMR vaccine.

Top image: http://healthlevelup.com/vaccinations-and-children/

Of late, more news has put the spotlight back on the MMR vaccine with the maker, Merck & Co, facing a class action suit in the U.S.

mmr 1

Image: http://www.whattoexpect.com/child-vaccinations/coping-with-shots.aspx

Excerpts from Natural News:  http://bit.ly/1zlffl9

 Back in 2010, two former Merck scientists, repulsed by what they saw taking place at the highest levels of the company, filed a False Claims Act in the U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of Pennsylvania. The filing accuses Merck of lying about the safety and effectiveness of MMR vaccines, tampering with study data, defrauding the U.S. government and various other high-level crimes.

Claims by Merck that the mumps component of the MMR vaccine is “95 percent effective” are also questioned in the filing. Stephen Krahling and Joan Wlochowski say Merck senior management falsified data specifically on the effectiveness of the mumps vaccine, intentionally spiking blood samples with animal antibodies in order to trick the public into thinking that the vaccine is effective.

“Merck… added animal antibodies to blood samples to achieve more favourable test results, though it knew that the human immune system would never produce such antibodies.”

However, all the rah-rah is just that…until the case goes to court. As parents, what we are concerned about is whether babies should be immunised. I would go for it because even if the shots are not as effective as claimed, something is better than nothing. Unless there is evidence that the vaccine is harmful, I wouldn’t forgo the shots as I’ve seen generations of children without their jawlines painted blue (like something out of Avatar).

FacebookTwitterGoogle+PinterestWhatsApp
Pages: 1 2 3

Submit a Comment

Leave a Reply

XSLT Plugin by Leo Jiang